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Volunteer High Performance Work Systems and Service Performance: An Empirical Study of Beijing Olympic Volunteers

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Abstract

This study examines the key human resources factors that affect volunteers’ service performance from the perspectives of volunteers and managers in the Beijing Summer Olympic Games of 2008. Survey data were collected from 1,727 volunteers and 243 managers at the Beijing Olympics test events held at 10 venues between November 2007 and April 2008. Regression analyses and a moderation test were combined to test the hypotheses. A set of high performance work systems (HPWS) for volunteers in the Beijing Summer Olympic Games were developed which include performance management, training, recognition, teamwork and volunteer participation. Volunteer HPWS were positively related to psychological empowerment, which was in turn positively related to service recovery performance. Moreover, transformational leadership moderates the relationship between volunteer HPWS and psychological empowerment in such a way that the relationship is stronger when transformational leadership is at a higher level than when it is at a lower level. Implications and limitations were also discussed.

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[Cai, Yujie] Centre for People and Organisation, School of Management, Swansea University, Swansea SA1 8EN, UK; Institute of Leadership and Education Advanced Development, Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Suzhou 215123, China

[Han, Jian] China Europe International Business School, Beijing 100193, China

[Peng, Siqing] Guanghua School of Management, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China

[Sun, Luping] Business School, Central University of Finance and Economics, Beijing 100081, China


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Source

Frontiers of Business Research in China

ISSN:1673-7326

Year:2016

Issue:4

Volume:10

Page:605-635

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