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How do leaders' perceptions of organizational health climate shape employee exhaustion and engagement? Toward a cascading-effects model

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Abstract

Although researchers and practitioners increasingly focus on health promotion in organizations, research has been mainly fragmented and fails to integrate different organizational levels in terms of their effects on employee health. Drawing on organizational climate and social identity research, we present a cascading model of organizational health climate and demonstrate how and when leaders' perceptions of organizational health climate are linked to employee well-being. We tested our model in two multisource studies (N-Study 1 = 65 leaders and 291 employees; N-Study 2 = 401 leader-employee dyads). Results showed that leaders' perceptions of organizational health climate were positively related to their health mindsets (i.e., their health awareness). These in turn were positively associated with their health-promoting leadership behavior, which ultimately went along with better employee well-being. Additionally, in Study 1, the relationship between perceived organizational health climate and leaders' health mindsets was moderated by their organizational identification. High leader identification strengthened the relationship between perceived organizational health climate and leaders' health mindsets. These findings have important implications for theory and practice as they show how the dynamics of an organizational health climate can unfold in organizations and how it is related to employee well-being via the novel concept of health-promoting leadership.

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[Kaluza, Antonia J.; Kern, Marcel; van Dick, Rolf] Goethe Univ Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany

[Schuh, Sebastian C.; Xin, Katherine] CEIBS, Shanghai, Peoples R China


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Source

Human Resource Management

ISSN:0090-4848

Year:2020

Issue:4

Volume:59

Page:359-377

ESI Discipline:ECONOMICS & BUSINESS;

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